Red and Black Lumberjack

…With the hat to match.

A few years ago I passed by a store that had the Woolrich logo on display in the window. I grabbed a picture of it (since lost) because I loved how they used the red and black check pattern for their logo, and combined it with a really modern sans-serif signature.

I’ve been quietly obsessed with it since. I even have plans to do a vehicle wrap with the pattern in the next year.

Anyways, this weekend I was back in that town and picked up a couple of Woolrich shirts. I’ve been on a flannel kick lately, so why not go with the classics?

Pictured above is the tag from one of the shirts. Digging around on their site and social media, I see they’re making great use of the pattern, balancing a fine line between classic/heritage and modern/relevant. This gallery from their Instagram has some great examples of how they balance the two.

The final picture in the gallery — the building exterior — is just what I’m thinking.

Forever Lake Louise

Lake Louise is easily my favourite place, any season. Winter months have my favourite skiing destination. You can find me on the Larch side, skiing the relatively deserted green runs entirely too fast. But the summer months really shine. Incredibly rewarding hiking trails are there, though most visitors don’t get past the shores of the lake.

Then if you’re willing to venture out from the Chateau grounds, you can visit the destinations nearby. Morraine Lake is a lot like Lake Louise, but even more beautiful. It’s one of the most photographed places in the world, even if it’s become far more difficult to access for its popularity. There are some pretty amazing hikes there as well.

Lake Louise is also at the southern tip of the Icefields Parkway. And if you’re willing to drive a few minutes up there, you’ll find plenty of awesome hikes, breathtaking mountains, and beautiful vistas that don’t see as many tour buses.

Seven questions to evaluate your design

It’s important to go beyond “Is this good,” or “Do I like it” when looking at design work. Here are seven questions that will help determine if that design is actually working.

  1. Is it authentic?
  2. Is it credible?
  3. Does it reflect the client’s personality?
  4. Is it interesting?
  5. Does it have emotional impact?
  6. How does it compare to competitors?
  7. Will it stand out in its intended environment?

Design’s Importance to Clients

While going through some underused reference materials I found this reference to the Danish Design Centre’s four levels of commitment that clients have to design.

  1. Nondesign
    Design is inconspicuous and performed by untrained/non-professional staff. User’s needs and points of view are not considered. This is decoration by amateurs.
  2. Design is Styling
    Design is only considered for the final product. It may be completed by designers, but non-professionals are primarily responsible for the direction of the project. “Let’s give this to a graphic artist to make it pretty.”
  3. Design as Process
    Design is viewed as a work method, and design principles/approaches are employed from the earliest stages. Solutions are driven by end-user requirements.
  4. Design as Innovation
    The designer collaborates with client executives in adopting innovative approaches to substantial parts of their business. Design processes are used to articulate the company’s vision to impact all aspects of the client’s products or services. Experience branding.